The Divorce High Road

May 4, 2011

Historically, few people travelled the high road of divorce.  This has been true in the past because the adversarial nature of the American justice system creates a “me versus you” structure to divorce. 

However, as new “non-court” legal processes like mediation and collaborative divorce have developed, lawyers have been able to offer clients a chance to take the high road in resolving their child custody, alimony, property division, and child support issues (while usually saving untold amounts of time, money and destruction).  These processes reject the “me versus you” approach of the courts with a joint problem solving approach borrowed from psychology, business and politics.  

As highlighted by this Huffington Post article on taking the high road in divorce, most people’s greatest concern in their divorce is their children.  The article highlights how taking the high road actually protects children from the negative impacts of divorce. 

This divorcee’s story is an example of the changing face of divorce:  From fear based mudslinging to respectful and dignified discussions.   As the author’s personal story reveals, taking the high road is not the easiest road, but it is usually the best road.

 

Randolph (Tré) Morgan III is an experienced family law attorney catering his practice to clients who want to walk the high road of divorce in Raleigh, Cary, Apex, Garner, Fuquay-Varina, Clayton, Smithfield, Wake Forest, RTP, Durham, Chapel Hill, Holly Springs and surrounding areas.  He focuses his practice in divorce, child custody, alimony, child support, equitable distribution, property division, paternity, guardianship and other family related matters.  

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